I want to be outraged, but I'm just sad

Apr 15 2013 Published by under This week in crazy, Uncategorized

I started today with a super breakfast/lunch and then headed to the airport on my way home from a super-fantastic vacation week. I was shocked when I got on the plane and saw the news that there had been two explosions at the finish line of the Boston Marathon. I watched in horror as the news stations replayed the horrific scene, showing the explosions. I almost cried when I saw the runner, just meters from the finish line, get knocked over by the blast. And I did get teary when I watched the interview with the doctor from the ER at Mass General who was describing the patients that had already arrived. I couldn't stop thinking of all the friends that I have in the Boston area, and trying to figure out where they were relative to Copley Square. I scoured my mind to try to figure out which of my friends were running today, so that as soon as I hit the ground I could try to check up on them. I can't imagine how scared and angry everyone in Boston must be feeling right now.

I want to be pissed off that anyone would decide that they were going to set up bombs in a crowd, at the finish line of a race. THE biggest marathon of the year. The one that almost every runner has thought about (even if, like me, you've never run it). I've trained with friends as they got ready for their qualifying race and then geared up for Patriot's Day. I've gotten up early to watch the race on TV and follow my friends online, cheering even though they couldn't hear me. The Boston Marathon is a Big Deal if you like to run. And thinking that someone would use this event to hurt the people that show up to cheer for people who decided they wanted to take on a 26.2 mile race For Fun is heartbreaking. What the fuck is wrong with people??

But even though I want to be pissed and angry at anyone that would do such a terrible, awful thing I can't get past just feeling sad. Sad for everyone that was at the finish line to cheer on the runners, and how they will live with the images from today for the rest of their lives. For the folks that were injured for no fucking reason and will have to rearrange their life so unexpectedly. And so sad for anyone that lost a loved one. And I'm sad to think about the reaction to this. Already in the news there are people arguing about whether Obama should call this a "terrorist" act. Who the fuck cares? I am so sick of hearing every tragic event get spinned by politicians and the media. It makes my stomach drop when folks use these events to play into to our worst fears, manipulating us into a reaction for their own purposes.

I wish that everyone would take a minute away from fear-mongering, spinning, and "explaining" to really think about how a lot of people got hurt very, very badly today. Some died. This is horrible and tragic. I have no doubt that our society will find someone to blame, get angry, and exact "justice". But just for today can we all just take minute to step away from the knee-jerk anger and mourn what was lost? To reflect on the lives of those that are changed forever by today, hug your friends and family, and take the time to check in with the people that you care about.

This is super-cheesy, and you probably already saw it floating around on FB or something. But I kinda like it anyway:

This quote went viral after the tragedy in Newtown and is making the rounds again, if my FB is any indication.

This quote went viral after the tragedy in Newtown and is making the rounds again, if my FB is any indication.

I'm sending every good thought I can to those that have been impacted by the events in Boston today - the folks that live there, anyone that has family or friends in the area, and all the runners and their supporters that were at the race today.

4 responses so far

  • Dr Becca says:

    Thank you for saying everything I'm thinking and feeling, but can't muster the energy to put into words.

  • DJMH says:

    Mr Rogers' words were the first thing that came to my mind, especially because in one of the videos I saw right after the first blast, you can see a bunch of people running *towards* the area. There are always helpers. Whatever sordid mind(s) created this, they are vastly outnumbered by the decent people.

  • Minos says:

    Some of the people running away were "helpers", too. NBC Sports was reporting that some of the marathon runners, after reaching the finish line, continued running to Massachusetts General Hospital to donate blood.

  • DrLizzyMoore says:

    I, too, feel incredibly sad by these events. Also, I am amazed by the bravery of the individuals who chose to help folks around them and fought every instinct to run away.

    Nicely said, Gerty!

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